Childrens' Art and Fitness Tax Credit

As Prime Minister, Andrew Scheer will help parents give their children every opportunity to get ahead.

With the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit, parentscan claim up to$1,000 per child, per year for expenses related to fitness or sports activities.

  • Parents will receive 15 per cent of eligible expenses for children under the age of 16.
  • This will be refundable, so lower-income Canadians benefit even more.
  • The credit will apply to eligible fitness expenses incurred on behalf of a qualifying child, meaning a child who is, at the beginning of a taxation year, under 16 years of age.
  • An eligible fitness expense is defined as a fee paid to a person or partnership that offers one or more prescribed programs of physical activity.
  • A prescribed program is defined as a program that is not part of a school’s curriculum, involves a significant amount of physical activity, and is of a duration of at least eight consecutive weeks or five consecutive days. Physical activity is defined as an activity that contributes to cardio-respiratory endurance and to one or more of muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and balance.
  • The benefit to a Canadian who claims the full credit of $1000 amounts to $150 of tax savings.
  • For parents of children living with a disability, the maximum age of eligibility will rise from 16 to 18, and parents will be able to claim an additional $500 per child. That’s up to $225 of tax savings per child, per year.

The Children’s Arts and Learning Tax Creditwill allow parents to claim up to $500 per child for arts-related expenses or other extracurricular educational activities.

  • Parents will receive 15 per cent of eligible expenses for children under the age of 16.
  • This new credit will be refundable, so lower-income Canadians benefit even more.
  • Eligible expenses include activities intended to contribute to a child's ability to develop creative skills or expertise, acquire and apply knowledge, or improve dexterity or coordination, in an artistic or cultural discipline including: literary arts; visual arts; performing arts; music; media; languages; customs; and, heritage.
  • Not many people know, but this original, Conservative policy covered language courses (which many new Canadian families used to improve their English or French) extra help for students in subjects like math, science, and coding. That will be the case again; this tax credit is flexible to allow parents to invest in their children’s education.
  • The benefit to a Canadian who claims the full credit of $500 amounts to $75 of tax savings.
  • For parents of children living with a disability, the maximum age of eligibility will rise from 16 to 18, and parents will be able to claim an additional $500 per child. That’s up to $150 of tax savings per child, per year.

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